The 4th Scottish Tattoo

at The Royal Albert Hall

Sunday 21 April 2002 "Scotland Forever"  

The script for this year is now released.  

As usual copyright is with Ian McLennan The Scottish Tattoo.

The show is set for the Royal Albert Hall and although the script will remain, one or two changes to the line up will occur on tour.

Ian McLennan

The scene…

Today  anywhere.  One musician’s thoughts out loud triggers a conversation and review of Scotland, its heroes and their effect on the Scottish psyche.

STUART (Strumming guitar and singing quietly to himself “Loch Lomond”)

MOIRA (joins Stuart also with guitar)

What are you doing Stu?  

 

STUART

Just singing the words to Loch Lomond and thinking about their meaning.

MOIRA

Ye’ll tak the high road and I’ll take the low road…

 

STUART

Whoa! That’s just it – we all sing it with great gusto – and it’s a great song, but really it’s very sad you know?

 

MOIRA

What do you mean?

 

STUART

Well, the song was written after Culloden.  When the soldiers were marching back from Derby, some fell behind and were captured and jailed in Carlisle. Two friends met a very different fate.  One was sentenced to hang and the other to be released – both at the same time. 

 

MOIRA

So what’s that got to do with Loch Lomond?

STUART

Well, it’s said that when you leave Scotland, you will always return – by normal means – the high road or, if you die, by the spiritual road – the low road.  So, the soldier who was going to be hanged knew that his journey back home to Loch Lomond would be much quicker on the low road than his friend’s trek back on the high road.  He also knew that his impending death meant that he would never see his true love again.  

 

MOIRA

I see what you mean! It really is a sad song!

STUART                                                                                                       

Aye, but now everyone sings it with the thought of a positive return to Scotland and that’s a good enough reason to sing it with gusto don’t you think?

MOIRA & STUART                                                                                  

Sing Loch Lomond – audience to sing too!

 

MOIRA

That was great – but what made you think about it in the first place?

 

STUART

Heroes! Those Loch Lomond soldiers had answered the call of their Prince and understood the price of freedom.  Ever since William Wallace and Robert the Bruce we have been fighting for freedom – to Scots it’s the meaning of life! 

 

MOIRA (Steps forward to front of the stage)

Just imagine being Wallace or Bruce and standing high in front of your army from all Scotland with Norse, Flemish and Irish too, knowing that for you and no other, despite facing a great army, your people will give their life for the freedom of Scotland. 

 

STUART                                                                                                       

Aye (with power), I call upon you cocks of the north, to fight like you have never fought before, to die if you have to but to live if you can – not for glory, nor riches, nor honour (joined by Moira and both finish the statement together) but for FREEEDOM , which no honest  man gives up but for life itself.

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS                                                                    

Cock o’ the North, Glendaruel Highlanders

BRASS BAND  Fighting music! 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS  (exit as entry)                               

Scotland the Brave, Rowan Tree

 

MOIRA (Excited by the sense of victory)

What great victories those guys had at Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn!

 

STUART (Pride bursts forth!)

The best!  Their heroism and leadership helped shape the Scottish psyche forever more.  Just imagine the effect at the time – after their real David versus Goliath triumphs.

 

MOIRA (elated)

Aye, real festivities with the ultimate joy of freedom.

 

IRISH DANCERS                                                                                        

CLIAR                                                                                                    

COUNTRY DANCERS                                                                            

Celtic Celebration

GAELIC CHOIR

HIGHLAND DANCERS                                                                            

STUART

There are another couple of heroes of mine, who died for King and country. James Graham the Earl of Montrose is the first.  A man of principle.  First to sign the National Covenant in 1638 to preserve religious freedom for Scotland, after Charles I tried to impose a co-ordinated Anglican – style worship.  He led the Covenanters against King Charles’s man in the North, the Marquis of Huntley and won the battle of “The Brig o’ Dee”. But he was also true to the king and successfully led the king’s Highland army against “King Campbell”.   The song “The Bonnie Lass of Fyvie” was written at the time of his victory.  Against all the odds he became master of Scotland and the Kings Viceroy.   

 

SCOTTISH DANCE BAND                                                                            Medley including Bonnie Lass o’ Fyvie

 

MOIRA

Montrose met a sticky end though. After Charles I was executed by Cromwell’s men, he fought to restore the throne for Charles II - but with only a small force he lost. He was then betrayed and taken to Edinburgh dressed in peasant clothes - tied to the back of a broken down nag. 

 

STUART

They hanged him at Mercat Cross, and like Wallace before him, cut him up and exhibited the bits all over the kingdom.

 

CLIAR                                                                                                           

STRING QUARTET                             

Medley inc Piper o’ Dundee

 

MOIRA

I can guess your other hero – the Bonnie Dundee!

 

STUART

You can read me like – a history book!

Yes John Graham of Claverhouse – Viscount Dundee!

He fought for James VII against William of Orange and was an inspirational leader.

 

MOIRA

He’s one of my favourites too but he wasn’t all good!  He was also known as “Bloody Clavers” for slaughtering many Covenanters.  But as Bonnie Dundee, like Montrose, he united the Highland clans for King James’s cause. 

 

STUART

William had the upper hand when he cut off King James’s Irish reinforcements at the Battle of the Boyne. 

 

IRISH DANCERS                                                                                        

BRASS BAND                                                                                    

MOIRA

Soon after, William called a Scottish parliament – even though only the king could do that.  It was a bit of a fiasco and at first Dundee said that King James had called the parliament – until he lost the vote - then he called it a “convention” and stormed out shouting to the king’s followers to follow him and return with their broadswords. 

STUART (Sings)

“To the lords of convention ‘twas Claverhouse spoke,

Ere the kings crown goes down there are crowns to be broke!”

MOIRA (Sings)

“So each cavalier who loves honour and me

Let him follow the Bonnets of Bonnie Dundee”

MOIRA & STUART (Sing Chorus to audience…some might even join in)

Altogether now…

“Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can

Come saddle my horses and call up my men

Unhook the West Port and let us gae free

For it’s up wi’ the bonnets o’ Bonnie Dundee”

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS                                                                    

Bonnie Dundee, Mucking of Geordie’s Byre, My Home, Orange and Blue, The Piper of Drummond, Lochanside

 

MOIRA

It’s rousing stuff right enough but once again he was a dead hero killed in battle!

 

STUART

Aye, the result was the Battle of Killiecrankie – which the Bonnie Dundee won - but was killed at the moment of victory when the clansmen were charging and killing all before them.  With no leader, the clan chiefs quarrelled and that was that.

 

MOIRA

So William lost the battle to John Graham of Claverhouse, but gained Scotland because of a stray musket ball….what might have been?

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS                                                                    

Battle of Killiecrankie

 

MOIRA

I agree with your choice of heroes, but just talking about heroes and leaders, did you know that Winston Churchill was MP for Dundee for a time? In one of his speeches he said “Of all the small nations of this earth, perhaps only the ancient Greeks surpass the Scots in their contribution to mankind.”

 

STUART

It’s odd to me that as part of Great Britain we helped create and lead the British Empire - yet we never managed to expand in our own right.

 

MOIRA

We came close once. Andrew Fletcher an Anti-unionist at the time of William of Orange met  William Paterson, the Scot who eventually founded the Bank of England. Paterson had a grand idea for the “Isthmus of Panama” – Darien as it was known then. 

 

STUART

Hmmn “Isthmus” – that’s easy for you to say! That’s where the American continent is divided by just 30 miles of land with no mountains – the overland link from the Atlantic to the Pacific without going round Cape Horn.

 

MOIRA

That’s it.  Paterson’s plan was to transport cargo to either side overland. Then dig a canal….the Panama canal.  If Scotland colonised Darien, they would gain the wealth.

 

STUART

Yes Fletcher and Lord Bellhaven raised all the money from within Scotland – a mighty feat! 

 

MOIRA                                                                                                         

Yes and in 1698, 3 ships and 1200 colonists sailed from Leith with great optimism and the hopes and wishes of Scotland sailing with them

 

COUNTRY DANCERS                                                                            

A Scottish Tribute

HIGHLAND DANCERS                                                                            

STUART

It ended in bankruptcy, which eventually led to the union between England and Scotland.  Andrew Fletcher earned the nickname “The Patriot” for his anti-union speeches.  He voiced the opinion of the ordinary people on both sides of the border!

 

MOIRA                                                                                                         

With the English covering the debts of Scottish nobles, it bought their votes and the act of union went through in 1707 - England and Scotland joined forces as Great Britain.

BRASS BAND  “British Music”

MOIRA

At that time, it was never an easy alliance and we had the ’15 and ’45 risings. 

 

STUART

Aye, the Bonnie Prince raised his standard at Glenfinnan. Imagine Prince Charlie’s face as Cameron of Lochiel came over the hill to answer the call.  (calls out across the hills …the stalls and circle!) “I call upon you Highlanders to put aside your clan differences and unite under my banner and fight for your rightful King, for Scotland and for your freedom”

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS   Piibroch o’ Donuil Dubh     

 

MOIRA

We both know that his father was the rightful king for both crowns so Charles had to try to march to London or regret it forever.

 

STUART

Aye they swarmed over the border and won all their battles on their way to Derby. But few English Jacobites joined the cause and they turned back – and all was lost.  Once the Highlanders had no cause to stay and fight, many drifted off to their families and farms.

 

MOIRA

Except that the few remaining bravely charged the Duke of Cumberland’s army at Culloden Moor. (Pause) No quarter was given and the blood of their slaughtered bodies mingled with the flowing burn, or stained red the bog where they lay.  

 

COMBINED BANDS                                                                                 

Amazing Grace            - Soloist Olivia McLennan

 

MOIRA

The Bonnie Prince sailed to Skye and away, leaving the Scots and the Highlanders, in particular, to face the consequences. 

 

CLIAR                                                                                                           

 

STUART

Bloody consequences there were – but even then the Highlanders were true to their prince. Despite a £30,000 reward on offer, he was never betrayed and once more they had stood for the freedom of their country.

 

BRASS BAND                                                                                    

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS

Roses of Prince Charlie, Skye Boat song, (Exit)Will ye no come back again

 

STUART                                                                                                       

That was a sad end to our chat Moira – I think I need to reflect on some other heroes for a wee minute – but unlike Charlie, I’ll be back in 20 minutes!   

 

MOIRA                                                                                                          Aye, I’ll see you then Stu.

INTERVAL 20 Mins

MOIRA             

Good to see you back Stu – and ready for more heroics I hope!

 

STUART

Aye, I’ve a head full of heroes now!  You know, after Culloden it was a bit of a North/South divide. Tartan was banned and no weapons could be carried – unless you were away in the British Army building the Empire!

 

MOIRA                                                                                                              

That’s right Stuart and did you know that at Clachan Seil, on the wee island just south of Oban there is a hotel known as Tigh-an-Truish - the House of Trousers.  This is where the Highlanders were landed when returning from army duty.  They had to change into trousers - leaving their kilts and weapons until they returned.

 

HIGHLAND DANCERS                                                                            

Seann Trubhas

CLIAR                                                                                                           

STUART

It was different in the South – there was stability after Culloden – everyone knew where they stood.  This enabled the southern Society to develop and it was a golden era for writers, scientists and inventers.  The whole world, flourished as a result of these Scots accomplishments – Scots led the industrial revolution and cities like Glasgow and Edinburgh were booming, taking in immigrants from the Highlands, Ireland and England to fuel their expansion. 

IRISH DANCERS                                                                                        

MOIRA

It’s amazing how just a few geniuses can change the course of a country’s history.

 

STUART

Never mind the country, they changed the world and made history. 

There are so many it takes the steam out of your sails – which is probably a good place to start.  Three Scots Patrick Miller, William Symington and Henry Bell are linked by the paddle steamer but their work transformed Glasgow and the nation as a whole.

 

MOIRA

I know that Patrick Miller invented a manual paddle-boat used by King Gustavus III of Sweden.  He gave Miller a gold box with some seeds inside as a thank you.  They grew into Swedes’s – the vegetable not the people – and transformed the winter fodder for Scots cattle so preventing the need to slaughter as winter approached.

 

STUART

His paddle-boat idea was developed by William Symington, who produced a steam driven paddle steamer to pull barges. 

 

MOIRA

I remember my history now – Henry Bell was the entrepreneur who launched the Comet Paddle Steamer in 1812- the first steamship service in Europe running between Glasgow, Greenock and Helensburgh.  That led to the Clyde pleasure steamers and encouraged the shipbuilding industry. 30,000 ships were built on the Clyde including Britannia the wooden paddle ship that sailed from Liverpool to Halifax, Nova Scotia in 12 days.

 

STUART

Not to mention the three Cunard liners Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth I & II that sailed round the world!

 

MOIRA                                                                                                         

That’s something for the Clyde folk to be proud of - and it improved the links with America and Canada.

BRASS BAND                                                                                                    

COUNTRY DANCERS                                                                            

Nova Scotia

 

STUART

For some reason Scotland has produced more than its share of talent their inventions, deeds and creative outpourings touch our everyday life and have shaped the world. On the one hand Scots led the industrial revolution – James Watt for instance – and on the other Writers and poets like Sir Walter Scott and Robert Burns have helped people the world over come to love Scotland, as they did.

 

FIONA DARROCH                                                                                       

Burns

 

STUART

The list of Scottish inventions is endless – but there’s a good list in this wee brochure I found outside. (Shows copy of the Tattoo programme to Moira)

 

MOIRA

We have had some medical breakthroughs too – not least we discovered that chloroform could be used as an anaesthetic so that operations could be done with the patient asleep!

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS                                                                    

Tipperary, Pack up your troubles, Dolly Gray

MOIRA                                                                                                              

When you talk of the British soldiers at war we have had two very distinguished Generals. Sir Hector MacDonald – in India, the Sudan and South Africa and also Douglas, Earl Haig who was Commander in Chief of the British Army in World War I.

 

STUART

“Fighting Mac” MacDonald.  Now there is a hero.  He rose from the crofts to be be Major-General – leading the Highland Brigade in the Boer War.

 

MOIRA                                                                                                              

It was said by his commander at the Battle of Omduman – “One might see 500 battles and never see such able handling of men in the presence of the enemy”

STUART

General Haig was an unbending general.  He so admired the Scots as fighters that he kept using the Scots regiments in the fiercest battles. The Somme, Passchendale and Arras where of the 120 battalions 44 were Scottish. Far more Scots died as a result – 147k - more than a quarter of all the deaths and 10% of all the Males between 45 and 49.

 

MOIRA

We paid a high price for his admiration.

 

COMBINED BANDS  Highland Cathedral

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS   Battle of the Somme, Heights of Dargai

STUART

Enough of these wars for a minute – let me tell you about the man who literally took the piss out of Glasgow – and got away with it!

 

MOIRA

This had better be good!

 

STUART

The best! Glasgow’s Charles MacIntosh is the man and he is responsible for protecting the whole world!

 

MOIRA

Against what?

 

STUART

Rain! He invented the raincoat.  But the story is much better than that.  He lived in late 1700’s to the early 1800’s – a time before sewers in Glasgow. 

 

MOIRA

When people used to open their window and tip their bucketful into the street!

 

STUART

Dead right.  A great time to catch a disease and die!  Anyway, MacIntoshes’ family owned a die works, where ammonia was used in the process.  As the business expanded, they could not get enough ammonia until MacIntosh had the idea to buy up all the urine!

 

MOIRA

So they extracted the ammonia and cleaned up the streets at the same time!   What a great idea!  I bet the people sang and danced in the street – without their wellies!

 

COUNTRY DANCERS                                                                            

New Zealand 1990

CLIAR                                                                                                           

IRISH DANCERS                                                                                        

STUART

That was just the beginning.  He then experimented by distilling the leftover tar from the Glasgow Glass Company and produced Naphtha a solvent.  He used this to dissolve rubber and produced surgical gloves - which he gave to the Glasgow infirmary – that eradicated many of the post operation infections that patients died from.   He added cloth to the solution and discovered that it was waterproof.   With that he made inflatables and, of course, the Mac which is worn all over the world.

 

MOIRA

So that inflatable doll you have you owe to Charles MacIntosh!  Seriously, that is a great story of a great and clever man and I am proud to be from Glasgow! (Sings) “I belong to Glasgow". We’ve had some canny inventers and builders but what about other leaders that have made their mark overseas and maybe reflect the Scottish psyche?  

STUART

Nae bother – remember that there are 12 Million people who can claim Scottish descent in North America.  In the USA 60% of their presidents have had Scottish origins and 9 of the first 13 US Governors were Scots!  That’s why more US and Canadians speak the Ghaidhlig than in Scotland and the Highland culture was preserved after the Clearances.

GAELIC CHOIR                                                           

SCOTTISH SMALL PIPES                                                             

CLIAR                                                               

MOIRA

Right - so name some of these leaders who have reflected the Scottish psyche.

 

STUART

Ok so – in Canada the MacKenzie’s have done well with providing Prime Ministers and also charting what became the MacKenzie river. 

 

MOIRA

And Sir John McDonald persuaded the provinces to become a confederation – and became Prime Minister.  He also had the vision for the Canadian Pacific Railway – which Scots controlled and built!

 

STUART

In the USA Andrew Carnegie made his fortune by being a very determined businessman.  He then decided to retire and spent the rest of his life giving his money away to the poor.  His philosophy was “Do better for the poor than they could do for themselves”.

 

MOIRA

Then there’s John Paul Jones, who was born in Dumfriesshire –  and lived the American dream – a rags to riches story – from pirate to Commander in Chief of the American Navy

 

STUART

The US Navy Manual still quotes him  “ The credit of the service depends not only in dealing fairly with the men employed in it but on their belief that they are and will be fairly dealt with”. 

 

HIGHLAND DANCERS                                                                            

Hornpipe

 

STUART

You know Moira today there are 20m people of Scots descent all over the world – four times more than at home.  Many of them leaders of their communities. 

 

MOIRA

That’s amazing Stu.  Did you know that Stewart Lamont has written a book in which he sums up some of the Scottish traits?   I have a few things he captured here.  (Unravels piece of paper with her notes on) For instance – all our songs are about fighting the English – but we have fought with them not against them, for 250 years!  

 

Away from home we are great leaders – we’ve had 8 British Prime Ministers – 9 if you count Tony Blair who was born in Scotland! 

Everybody’s equal no matter what their rank. Then there’s our great put down to someone too big for his boots – “Och I kent his father”

STUART

The motto on our Scottish Arms is  “Memo me impune lacessit” – Who dares meddle wi’ me? 

 

MOIRA

Or in Glasgow “See you Jimmy”!

We’re proud fighters – and we fight in all ways – at our best defending a principle. We have even been known to be a wee bit violent to each other on occasion! 

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS

Green Hills, When the Battle’s O’er

 

STUART                                                                   

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote:

"The old land is still the true love, the others are but pleasant infidelities.  Scotland is indefinable, it has no unity except upon the map.  Two languages, many dialects, innumerable forms of piety, and countless local patriotisms and prejudices, part us among ourselves more widely than the extreme east and west of that great continent America.  When I am at home, I feel a man from Glasgow to be something like a rival, a man from Barra to be more than half a foreigner.  Yet let us meet in some far country and whether we hail from the braes of Manor or the braes of Mar, some ready-made affection joins us on the instant.  It is not race.  Look at us One is Norse, one Celtic and another Saxon.  It is not a community of tongue.  We have it not among ourselves; and we have it almost to perfection with English, Irish and American.  It is no tie of faith, for we detest each other’s errors.  And yet somewhere, deep down in the heart of each of us, something yearns for the old land and the old kindly people". 

Sings “Back in the homeland”  

MOIRA

Stuart, I think we have found some of our heroes and maybe touched the soul of our people past, present and future.  We are truly blessed to be able to say we are of the same stock as these people.

 

STUART

Aye – let’s remember all our heroes, born in Scotland or of Scots descent, living and dead, some who have changed the world, and many who have given their lives, at home and overseas, to defend our freedom.

CLIAR                                                                                                           

STRING QUARTET                                                                            

Ashokan’s Farewell

 

BRASS BAND (with some pipes)                                                               

Alone with my thoughts (Erik Spence)/ Sunset

(This is a world Tattoo premiere. Thank you Erik)

LONE PIPER                                                                                    

COMBINED BAND & SINGERS

Flower of Scotland

 

STUART                                                                  

Sings Alba Gu Brath, Scotland Forever                                            

We tell a good story Moira and we love to sing Auld Lang Syne – it may not always be the Christmas no.1 but it see’s in the new year the world over.

 

MOIRA

Aye as usual great talking to you Stu and I think a few others were eavesdropping our wee chat!

 

STUART

Nae bother Moira. As Keir Hardie said – “We’re all Jock Tamsin’s bairns”

 

COMBINED BANDS                                                                                 

Auld Lang Syne

 

MASSED PIPES & DRUMS                                                                    

We’re no awa tae bide awa, Highland Laddie, Black Bear

Thanks and good night to all  

Haste ye back 

ãIan McLennan - The Scottish TattooÔ 30 January 2002